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In order for the clicker to have meaning to your dog, it must be "charged." This means that you will teach your dog that the metallic clicking sound means that a treat is coming. You do this by associating each click with a piece of food. 

 

STEPS

 
 

In order for the clicker to have meaning to your dog, it must be "charged." This means that you will teach your dog that the metallic clicking sound means that a treat is coming. You do this by associating each click with a piece of food. 

  1. Click your clicker and deliver a treat immediately after. Remember to return your treat delivery hand back to a neutral position or "home base" after delivering a treat to your dog.

  2. Repeat. Vary treat placement. Sometimes deliver  a treat from your hand to your dog's mouth and other times tossing the treat on the ground. Work for 30 seconds to 1 minute at a time, taking short breaks in-between. 

  3. End your training session by doing something else your dog enjoys (e.g. playing fetch, tug, belly rub). 

 
 

YOU'LL NEED:

  1. Clicker

  2. Treat bag and treats

  3. Distraction-free environment 

  4. Your dog

SET UP:

Prepare for training in advance, before working with your dog. Gather your clicker, treat bag with treats, and choose a quiet, boring spot in your house. 

 

This training exercise will teach your dog to “check-in” with you periodically and reinforce focusing on you in the presence of distractions. We will be building on, and talking about adding a cue for this behavior in upcoming classes.

 

STEPS

 

1. Wait for eye contact.

Wait for your dog to look at you. Since you’ve chosen a boring spot, and you’re the only interesting thing in the room, it shouldn’t be long before your dog glances your way! The instant your dog makes eye contact, click and toss a treat on the ground for her. 

2. Be ready to click again.

Watch your dog as she eats it and, as soon as she’s finished, be prepared to click again for eye contact and toss another treat. Repeat more times.

3. End with something fun. 

End the training session by doing something else your dog enjoys, like playing fetch, tug, or giving him a belly rub.

 
 

YOU'LL NEED:

  1. Clicker Treat

  2. Bag and treats

  3. Distraction-free environment

  4. Your dog

SET UP:

Prepare for training in advance, before working with your dog. Gather your clicker, treat bag with treats, and choose a quiet, boring spot in your house. 

 

In this activity you will teach your dog to target your hand with her nose. Hand targeting teaches your dog how to appropriately interact with a human hand. It is also a very versatile foundation behavior that will help you train other behaviors later on. Most dogs quickly learn to love hand targeting.

 

STEPS

 

1. Present your hand, click.

Begin by presenting your hand right in front of the dog’s nose, just an inch or so away. The instant your dog touches or sniffs your hand, click and treat. Repeat this step several times, removing and then presenting your hand again after each repetition.

2. Present your hand to the side.

When your dog is reliably touching your hand when presenting an inch or so in front of his nose, begin to present your hand to the left or right, still just an inch or so away from the nose. Repeat this step several times.

3. End with something fun.

End the training session by doing something else your dog enjoys, like playing fetch, tug, or giving him a belly rub.

 
 

YOU'LL NEED:

  1. Clicker Treat

  2. Bag and treats

  3. Distraction-free environment

  4. Your dog

SET UP:

Prepare for training in advance, before working with your dog. Gather your clicker, treat bag with treats, and choose a quiet, boring spot in your house. 

* Remember to click with the opposite hand you use for targeting.